What does the Law Say?

What does the Law Say?

The Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) published the amended regulations on Alien and Invasive Species (AIS) in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act 01 August 2014. The AIS Regulations have been through extensive public consultation, and have secured agreement from various key industries, including the nursery industry, landscape industry, plantation industry, game ranchers industry, agricultural industry, pet-traders industry, bass and carp angling representatives and other key groups. Alien and Invasive Species (AIS) in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, on Friday 1st August 2014. A total of 559 alien species are now listed as invasive, in four different categories. A further 560 species are listed as prohibited, and may not be introduced into the country. Category 1a: Invasive species which must be combatted and eradicated. Any form of trade or planting is strictly prohibited. Category 1b: lnvasive species which must be controlled, where possible removed and de-stroyed. Any form or trade or planting is strictly prohibited. Category 2: lnvasive species, or species deemed to be potentially invasive, for which a permit is required to carry out a restricted activity. Category 2 species include commercially imported species such as pine, wattle and gum trees. Category 3: lnvasive species which may remain in prescribed areas or provinces. However, conditions apply. Further planting, propagation, trade, or gifting is prohibited. WHAT IS REQUIRED OF A PROPERTY OWNER AFTER 1 OCTOBER 2014? Declaration of Invasive Species NEMBA (2004): Chapter 5, Part 2, page 60, 73 (2) A person who is the owner of land on which a listed invasive species occurs must notify any relevant competent authority in writing of the listed invasive species occurring on that land. NEMBA Alien and Invasive Species Regulations (2014): Chapter 7, Section 29, (1), (2), (3): The seller of any immovable property must, prior to the conclusion of the relevant sale agreement, notify the purchaser of that property in writing of the presence of listed invasive species on that property. PENALTIES Failing to comply with the law by ignoring directives or denying access to property can incur imprisonment of up to ten years, or a fine not exceeding R10,000,000! Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

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Alien Invasive Species Introduction.

Alien Invasive Species Introduction.

“If we give our very best to all the children of today, and if we pass on our planet in the fullness of her beauty and natural richness, we will be serving the children of the future” ~Nelson R Mandela Alien Invasive Species (A.I.S) Species that grow and reproduce quickly, and spread aggressively with potential to cause harm, are given the label of “invasive”.  An invasive species can be any kind of living organism – an amphibian, plant, insect, fish, fungus, bacteria or even an organism’s seeds or eggs that is not native to an ecosystem and which causes harm. They are the biggest threat to plant and animal biodiversity: they have become established in over 10million hectares of land in South Africa, and the cost of controlling them is estimated at R600 million a year over 10 years. WHY ARE A.I.S. SUCH A THREAT TO THE ENVIRONMENT? The impacts of alien invasive species are immense, insidious and usually irreversible.  They may be as damaging to native species and ecosystems on a global scale as the loss and degradation of habitats. WHERE DO INVASIVE SPECIES SOME FROM? Thousands of alien species have been introduced into the country over the past 350 years, and hundreds of them have become invasive. WHAT ARE THE CONSEQUENCES OF INVASIVE SPECIES? They reduce water supplies, increase erosion, exacerbate wildfires, degrade valuable range lands, threaten the health of people and livestock, reduce productivity in agriculture, and impact negatively on our remarkable biodiversity.  The economic damage caused by these invasions has been estimated at billions of Rands per year, and is set to grow as invasive species spread, and as more species are introduced and become invasive.  The heavy use of chemical pesticides, insecticides and herbicides to control invasive pests has in itself had detrimental consequences to ecosystems across the world, leading to pollution of soil and water, as well as causing harm to plants, animals and people working in the fields. WHAT CAN BE DONE TO DETER THE SPREAD OF A.I.S.? Promote the planting of indigenous species, or safe exotic species that have stood the test of time. Eradicate and control invasive introduced species and possible replace with in suitable indigenous plants Reduce the rate of spread of invasives and reduce the impacts of existing invasions Gain support of individuals, organizations and businesses in the private and public sectors. Create awareness of the problem of A.I.: the risks associated with any activity involving biological invasions, the legal requirements that regulate the ownership, cultivation, trade and transport of alien species.     Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in...

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