horti.co.za newsletter

Posted by on September 7, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

horti.co.za newsletter

Businesses, services, vacancies, events, Open Gardens, workshops, specialists, products, training. Spring is here. The busiest time of the year – at least for us. Welcome to the September edition of our newsletter. The many events coming up in the next couple of weekends include the Cape Horticultural Society plant sale in Muizenberg, the Somerset West Hospice Open Gardens and the Johannesburg Garden Meander.  This Monday also sees the start of the SAN parks free entry week – free entry to SA citizens to most of the national parks around the country. There are orchids in George, wildflowers in Darling, and the Flower Festival in Hermanus to keep you busy. The beautiful Benvie in Karkskloof officially open their gates from the 22nd Sept, however due to the nice rain in August, and the clivias and azaleas starting to bloom, they are opening from this coming weekend (8th September) onwards. The organisation Soil for Life has a grow to live workshop in Constantia, and Calitzdorp are holding their annual succulent festival later in the month. There plenty of Open Gardens in October and November to inspire… including the Encounter East Griqualand Open Gardens and the Rustenberg Open Gardens (see more below). There will be more details in our next email newsletter, but in the meantime, look online for all the open gardens and EVENTS. You can choose to see what’s going on in your specific area or everything country-wide. Or search for an item e.g. ‘orchids’. If you know of any more up-coming sales, open gardens, workshops etc, please let us know about them.fiona@horti.co.za.  Or add them yourself! Don’t get lost with horti.co.za Did you know that you can get driving directions for all the Open Gardens listed on www.horti.co.za? Just go to www.horti.co.za, search for your event, and click on the ‘get driving directions’. Google maps will take you there! SIMPLE!Google maps will also give you an estimated travel time – useful if you want to plan your time of arrival or get there early for the plant sales! Spotlight on Benvie, Karkloof Benvie is one of KZN’s most majestic private gardens.  Spread over 70 acres, this historic garden was established in 1882 by John Geekie. With huge trees and blooming with rhododendrons and azaelas in springtime, it is filled with a myriad of colours – pinks, whites and purples. It is enchanting, tranquil and exquisite. An oasis of peace, great for birders and an inspiration for avid gardeners. Stellenbosch Historic Gardens: Rustenburg One of our main and loyal sponsors, Rustenberg Wine Estate and Gardens is holding their open gardens over 3 days, 26th, 27th, 28th October 2018. A large, beautiful, farm garden it has mature trees and unusual plants, and surrounds the estate’s spectacular Cape Dutch buildings. The gardens are essentially old English in style, with different rooms, and hundreds of old fashioned roses. Historic, expansive, magnificent, beautiful. it really is not to be missed. Biosecurity within South Africa. What with the recent announcement of another new pest in South Africa – the Polyphagous shot hole borer, and in another area, the detection of theoriental fruit fly, biosecurity is something to be taken seriously. Here is a shortened article (sourced from the agri handbook), which has some links to biosecurity information and plant health directorates. Astrobotany. With our feet (normally!) firmly planted in the soil, it’s something different to consider that plants are being sown, grown and harvested in space. Arabidopsis plants (related to mustard) were harvested inside Europe’s Columbus laboratory...

read more

National Arbor Week 2018.

Posted by on August 29, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

National Arbor Week 2018.

Arbor Day originated in 1872 in the United States territory of Nebraska. Mr. J. Sterling Morton, a newcomer to the treeless plains of Nebraska, was a keen proponent of the beauty and benefit of trees. He persuaded the local agricultural board to set aside a day for planting trees and through his position as editor of Nebraska’s first newspaper, encouraged participation in the event by publishing articles on the value of trees for soil protection, fruit, shade and building. Mr. Morton’s home, known as Arbor Lodge, was a testament to his love for trees and so inspired the name of the holiday; Arbor Day.Within two decades Arbor Day was celebrated in every US State and territory, and eventually spread around the world. The tradition continues annually in the second week of August, in global acknowledgment of Mr. Morton’s slogan, “other holidays repose upon the past; Arbor Day proposes for the future.” In South Africa, Arbor Day was first celebrated in 1983. The event captured the imagination of people who recognised the need for raising awareness of the value of trees in our society. As sources of building material, food, medicine, and simple scenic beauty, trees play a vital role in the health and well-being of our communities. Collective enthusiasm for the importance of this issue in South Africa inspired the national government, in 1999, to extend the celebration of Arbor Day to National ArborWeek. From 1 to 7 September every year, schools, businesses and organisations are encouraged to participate in community “greening” events to improve the health and beauty of the local environment and propose a green future for South Africa. Many countries across the globe will recognize the importance of educating youths about the benefits of keeping our environment as green as possible. With this in mind, many countries celebrate Arbor Day once a year – a day on which trees are planted and emphasis is placed on the importance they play in the circle of life. In South Africa, Arbor Day is celebrated for an entire week. National Arbor Week in South Africa is a time when South Africans of all ages are encouraged to celebrate the beauty and importance of trees. People from all aspects of the community are urged to get involved and thousands are educated and made aware of the benefits of the many different aspects of forestry. For the sake of simplification, the term ‘forestry’ is divided into three different categories during National Arbor Week. The first is that of Indigenous Forests, which not only provide a home for wildlife but which provide attractions for thousands visitors and increase revenue. Indigenous Forests may also provide trees and herbs which are often used for natural remedies on which hundreds of people depend. They provide a barrier against soil erosion and they continue to sustain their environment and support the African wildlife. Commercial Forests, on the other hand, are completely unnatural. But their role is equally important since they not only provide people with jobs, but they also provide the wood which is needed in industry. Metropolitan Forests refers to the trees, plants and lawns which are grown in cities and towns across the country. Without these small pieces of greenery amidst the concrete and brick, our environments would be dull and lifeless. Breathing would also be difficult since there would be little...

read more

Tanya Visser is coming to Knysna.

Posted by on July 31, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

Tanya Visser is coming to Knysna.

Calling all avid gardeners!  Please keep Wednesday the 10th October open,  Tanya is coming to town!!  Meet this delightful bubbling personality who is full of enthusiasm, knowledge and pure common sense when it comes to gardening. Please phone Cobus at 082 8944912 to book your seat.   Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

read more

Calitzdorp Succulent Show.

Posted by on July 13, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

Calitzdorp Succulent Show.

The Calitzdorp Succulent Show 2018 : See details of events, bookings etc. HOME  EVENTS  NEWS  PROJECTS GALLERIES CONTACT VETPLANT  > VETPLANTFEES 2018 Vetplantfees 2018 IMPORTANT INFORMATION OVERVIEW DATES/TIMES VENUE ACTIVITIES ADMISSION MASSIVE PLANT SALE RARE PLANT AUCTION EXPERT TALKS WORKSHOPS (NEW) VELDWALKS Trained Cape Nature guides will escort small groups of enthusiast on a 90-minute walk to Calitzdorp’s famous Jakkalskop where dozens of succulent plant varieties will be in flower. It is an experience not to be missed and have proven to be very popular with festivalgoers. DATES & TIMES Vetplantfees – Veld Walk – 22 Sept 2018 – 10:00 Vetplantfees – Veld Walk – 22 Sept 2018 – 16:30 Vetplantfees – Veld Walk – 23 Sept 2018 – 09:00 Vetplantfees – Veld Walk – 23 Sept 2018 – 16:30 Vetplantfees – Veld Walk – 24 Sept 2018 – 09:00 Vetplantfees – Veld Walk – 24 Sept 2018 – 13:00 BOOKING & PAYMENT Booking and payment are essential as only 8 persons will be accommodated on each of the scheduled walks. The fee to join each walk is R150, payable in advance and non-refundable on cancellation. Veld Walks will open for booking and payment by 1 August 2018 on this website. WHERE TO MEET Each walk will depart from the main festival paypoint every day. IMPORTANT Participants should wear shoes suitable for walking in the veld and bring water, a hat and sun protection. BOOKING Booking will open by 1 August 2018 on this website. SCHEDULE OF EVENTS SATURDAY, 22 SEPTEMBER 09:00 — 17:00 Plant & Art Exhibition, Vendor Sales, Children’s Activities, Food Vendors 10:00 – Veld Walk* >> More Info 11:00 – Expert Talk Details coming soon. 12:00 – Workshop Container Gardening with Succulents* (Alison James) >> More Info 13:00 – Expert Talk Details coming soon. 14:00 – Workshop* Details coming soon. 16:30 – Veld Walk >> More Info 18:00 – Dinner & Keynote Speech* Details coming soon. * Fees apply. Advance booking required. SUNDAY, 23 SEPTEMBER 09:00 — 17:00 Plant & Art Exhibition, Vendor Sales, Children’s Activities, Food Vendors 09:00 – Veld Walk* >> More Info 11:00 – Expert Talk Details coming soon. 12:00 – Workshop Container Gardening with Succulents* (Alison James) >> More Info 13:00 – Expert Talk Details coming soon. 14:00 – Workshop* Details coming soon. 15:00 – Rare Plant Auction Details coming soon. 16:30 – Veld Walk* >> More Info * Fees apply. Advance booking required Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

read more

Today 3rd July is International Plastic Free Day.

Posted by on July 3, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

Today 3rd July is International Plastic Free Day.

Most of us use them every day, the thin plastic bags used by almost every retailer we visit. Whether we’re shopping for groceries or the newest Prada, you can almost guarantee that you’ll be leaving the store with a plastic bag stuffed full of your new goodies. Then, when you arrive home, you’ll quickly remove them like a kid opening Christmas presents, tossing aside the wrapping with thoughtless abandon. Have you ever stopped to consider what happens to those plastic bags? Has it ever occurred to you just how many of them we go through, individually, in a year? International Plastic Bag Free Day is dedicated to heightening awareness about these and very real and pressing issues brought about by this most popular of disposable carrying devices. We are reminded that those bags we pick up from the retailers are used for an incredibly short time, usually under 25 minutes, and are then disposed of. They may pass out of our thinking then, but they do not pass out of our world. Plastic bags remain in the world for anywhere from 100-500 years before finally decaying completely, and have a profound impact upon our environment as a result. Out in the great reaches of the ocean are massive reefs made up of all sorts of plastic waste, and plastic bags play heavily among them.  Such is the magnitude of the problem that these great floating islands reach hundreds of miles, like great monuments to mankind’s wastefulness, and disregard for the world upon which we live. International Plastic Bag Free Day gives us an opportunity to remind ourselves, and others, that every action we take, and every bag we dispose of, effects the lives of everyone in the world for generations to come. How to Observe International Plastic Bag Free Day There are a lot of good ways to celebrate, and the easiest requires a simple resolution on your part. Even if just for one day, choose paper over plastic, or even better bring your own bags to the retailers to pick up your goods.  Some stores even offer discounts or other perks for the customers that bring their own! If you own a store yourself, start a program to encourage your customers to bring in their own reusable containers and stop offering plastic bags as an option.If you want to become even more proactive, then you can head to http://www.plasticbagfreeday.org/ to help organize events, network with other people in your area and around the world who are striving to make a difference, or find an event to volunteer and help with yourself! There’s also an option to tell a story about a bag free day to your fellow plastic bag free folks! Among the most popular activities for International Plastic Bag Free Day are simple gatherings of people walking roadways, beaches, and rivers and picking up all the garbage they find there. Everyday millions of plastic bags get disposed of, and without active people like yourself getting involved, the future is going to be dealing with hundreds of millions of pounds of plastic bags clogging oceans, rivers, and the world at large. The problem has reached such proportions that what was once clean sand on the beaches of the world are now being found to be made of composites of natural substances and garbage...

read more

RHS Rosemoor: What to expect at Britain’s finest Rose Festival

Posted by on June 14, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

RHS Rosemoor: What to expect at Britain’s finest Rose Festival

Rose Festival The Rose Festival celebrates the beauty and diversity of this favourite flower from Saturday 16 June until Sunday 22 July 2018 Rosemoor’s five-week-long Rose Festival offers a breath-taking showcase of colours and scents of the nation’s favourite flower. Boasting one of the UK’s largest collections of roses, RHS Garden Rosemoor is home to two dedicated rose gardens, bringing together more than 2,000 roses across more than 200 different varieties and a wealth of hues and perfumes. From cottage garden climbers, to bright and beautiful container varieties, there will be a rose to inspire and suit all gardens. As well as the stunning gardens, visitors can enjoy guided tours, expert advice from RHS horticulturists, a floral themed craft market, a rose trail, and much, much more. Country Life June 14, 2018 The RHS Rosemoor Rose Festival begins on Saturday June 16, a five-week celebration of Britain’s favourite flower that’s without peer.   The Queen Mother’s Rose Garden in Summer at RHS Garden Rosemoor. Every year, some eight billion roses are grown and sold in the UK – it’s the nation’s favourite flower. As such, the start, this Saturday, of the five-week Rose Festival at RHS Garden Rosemoor in Devon (which runs until July 22) is most welcome; the collection there is the largest in the country and includes 2,000 roses across 200 varieties, hues and scents. To celebrate the start of the festival, we’ve collected some superb pictures of previous year – to entice you along if you can, and to give you a flavour of what you’re missing if you can’t make it. There will be tours, expert advice and a floral-themed craft market; new this year is a planting of Rosa pax, a hybrid musk rose launched in 1918 to commemorate the end of the First World War. For more details visit www.rhs.org.uk/gardens/rosemoor Red Rosa ‘Dortmund’, Rosa ‘Comtesse de Murinais’, Rosa ‘Open Arm’ in the Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor Devon   The Shrub Rose Garden in June, RHS Rosemoor The Shrub Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor Cottage Garden at RHS Rosemoor Rosa ‘Erfurt’ pink roses in the Shrub Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor The Shrub Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor in June Another view of the Shrub Rose Garden in June, RHS Rosemoor The thatched-roof summerhouse in the Cottage Gardenat RHS Rosemoor   Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

read more

Remembering the 7th June, 2017.

Posted by on June 7, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

Remembering the 7th June, 2017.

“Scores of people were evacuated from their homes in Knysna as a fire threatens property in the Garden Route town. A section of the N2 between Knysna and Plettenberg Bay was closed to traffic as the fire is burning on both sides of the road. The first fire, which broke out near Plettenberg Bay on Tuesday night, was contained but there is another fire burning in a vast area close to Rheenendal. Strong winds are pushing the flames towards homes in Belvidere, Breonton-on-Sea and Rheenendal. Knysna Fire Chief Clint Manuel says crews are trying to get as many people away from danger. “We have evacuated the entire Belvidere and some people have come out, but we are getting reports of some people still on the inside. We are still trying to get them out and we are also trying to get them to the jetty where the NSRI can also pick them up.” Resident Richard Wallis says the situation is really bad. “Knysna is in perpetual darkness. It’s a disaster here. It’s crazy. Some people are fire-locked. They have water on the one side and the fire on the mountains on the other side. It’s really bad.” At the same time, three people have been reported dead in an incident emergency services are linking to the strong winds brought in by the storm which continues to sweep through the Peninsula. A farm worker and his wife and son are reported to have died in the area were fires fanned by Berg winds.” These were some of the reports, but it is the pictures that tells the story. A story that will be etched in the memory of all who have been affected.  A story of trauma, a story of compassion, a story of communities getting together helping one another, a story of rebuilding and  of new hope. On the 7th June, we were watching the fires encircling Knysna, but they seem to be a safe distance away … how wrong we were and how unprepared. We were totally unaware of the fire racing up the hill from  Salt river and Eastford,   the smoke was so dense that you could hardly see anything.  Only when the neighbours screamed that their house was on fire, the reality of the situation came home.  At that moment  the only thing on one’s mind was to find a safe place, away from the raging fire,  the stifling smoke and the incredible strong wind that was  whipping up fireballs. We evacuated at about 5.30 pm, not knowing what will happen. All we had with us were our phones, tablets and  a file which contained documents, and passports.  At that moment everything seemed to  trivial, all possessions become meaningless, only safety was a priority.  A kind of numbness enveloped one, a feeling of having an awful nightmare, that you will wake up and all will be well ….. We made our way down the hill with houses ablaze on both sides, fireballs were igniting tall palm trees that went up like  flaming torches.  Driving  was a nightmare as all the exit roads from Knysna were blocked.  Thesen Islands, Leisure Isle, The Quays and the Angling Club were safe havens for some folk to sleep the night, people also found safe places were they could parked along...

read more

World Environment Day, 5th June

Posted by on June 4, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

World Environment Day, 5th June

World Environment Day Since it began in 1974, it has grown to become a global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated in over 100 countries. (WED) is rearing its green head this Tuesday, 5 June, and here’s what you can do  in honour of the day. Visit one of Knysna’s nature reserves and pay it some much warranted love and appreciation. Avoid the use of plastic. Pledge Nature Reserve, Knysna CBD:  Help to restore this reserve to its formal glory were fynbos and forest species once thrived. The reserve was totally destroyed in the fire of 7th June 2017.  Masses of wattle and other invasive aliens have colonised the reserve, now it is up to dedicated volunteers to remove  the unwanted plant growth. Volunteer your services for 1 hour every Wednesday morning from 9.30.  The aim is to eradicate  all invasive species from the reserve.   Log on to: http://www.pledgenaturereserve.org/ Steenbok Nature Reserve, Leisure Isle: This lovely reserve is a haven for dog walkers, runners, and small children. The indigenous garden offers seasonal colour with magical backdrops of the Lagoon and Outeniqua Mountains.  Make a meaning contribution by joining Friends of Steenbok.  Log on to:  http://www.steenboknaturereserve.org.za/ READ: Endangered Species Day: What you need to know to help save SA’s natural heritage     Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

read more

Pearlfisher plastic awareness garden designer urges RHS to lead from the front

Posted by on May 23, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

Pearlfisher plastic awareness garden designer urges RHS to lead from the front

This garden was awarded a Gold medal. 21 May 2018, by Matthew Appleby John Warland, designer of the Space to Grow garden, which is in partnership with NGO Plastic Oceans, says the RHS should lead from the front and ban plastic drink bottles from the show. Pearlfisher Warland said: “I think this garden should be a wake up call, drawing a line in the sand. Hopefully the RHS will now lead from the front with the demographic they have.” The show has banned plastic straws but there were no restrictions on plastic bottles, cutlery, plates, coffee cups, packaging, and plant pots. “Having a garden is generally a luxury and as is to come to Chelsea Flower Show. “The people who can come and have a garden have the money in their pocket to make a practical choice. “There is free water refills with Thames Water and no plastic straws but it would be good to lead from the front and take a little bit further. It would be nice if they couldn’t buy plastic drink bottles and in the next 12 months make every one a returnable bottle.” “There is 100% of waste recycled at the recycler but I think is a feel good to make that choice at this point and not at the waste depot. “People at the show would buy into that and be proud of it. It’s marginal gains but no plastic bottles you can buy in at the showground 2019 would be a win. It would be an easy win for RHS. He said having seen Kew Temperate House re-open last month, he believes a plant polymer from Kew could win a Nobel prize for beinga  plastic substitute. “I’m sure it will be some naturally-based material.” Prime Minster Theresa May visited the garden on 21 May. May has proposed plastic-free supermarket aisles, plus a ban on plastic straws, cotton buds and drinks stirrers. May also saw the Action Oak APHA garden and the Wuhan Water Garden at Chelsea. The RHS will visit Guangzho this year and is aiming for a Chelsea garden a year from 10 Chinese provinces, while a Chinese Chelsea remains a possibility. UK participation at the Beijing International Horticultural Expo 2019 is being led by the RHS and has received the backing of the Prime Minister.  Warland said when he entered the garden into Chelsea 12 months ago, plastic was not high on the agenda in horticulture. But since then Blue Planet 2 on BBC had highlighted plastic pollution in oceans. The garden, made of aquatic tanks plus cacti, succulents and Tillandsia imitating underwater coral and algae, highlights “the irrevocable impact of plastic waste on our precious ecosystems and is a call to action to brands, businesses and designers to create sustainable lifecycles for products and packaging.” Warland added that the garden industry is aware of the issue but in what is “often a business of narrow margins” only certain plants will be sold in non-plastic pots “not to say there shouldnt be that choice”. The RHS has banned plastic straws at Chelsea and made moves to replace plastic with biodegradable materials at Wisley. “The RHS supports the government’s intentions to drive down plastic waste and is committed to helping the UK’s 27million gardeners to reduce their environmental impact. “In 2018, we made the decision to ban...

read more

8 Chelsea Flower Show 2018 gardening trends you can try at home

Posted by on May 22, 2018 in Events | 0 comments

8 Chelsea Flower Show 2018 gardening trends you can try at home

We’ve scoured Chelsea for the best new trends you can try in your own garden this summer PAULA MCWATERS BY PAULA MCWATERS MAY 22, 2018 Want to know all the Chelsea Flower Show 2018 gardening trends? This year’s show is underway and we were lucky enough to join the VIPs and royalty on Monday’s press day. CL Gardening Editor Paula McWaters has scoured the Chelsea Show Gardens and Artisan Gardens the displays to pick up on some of the best new trends you can try at home in your own garden this summer… 1Bring water centre stage PAULA MCWATERS At the end of a long tiring day, water is one of the most relaxing elements to come home to – both cooling and soothing to the nerves. Instead of confining it to one small area of the garden, David Neale has made it the central feature, wrapping paths of Portland stone and English oak around it so that the pool can be enjoyed from all sides. His planting scheme centres on rich blue Anchusa azurea ‘Dropmore’ with pops of amber and copper from bearded Iris ‘Carnival Time’, echoed in the rusted planters and citrus peel sculpture. Garden: The Silent Pool Gin Garden Designer: David Neale 2A romantic gesture PAULA MCWATERS There’s a return to old-fashioned romance in several of the gardens on Chelsea’s Main Avenue this year, with cottage favourites such as lupins and delphiniums making a welcome comeback. In the Artisan gardens, Janine Crimmins has gone for a country house feel, complementing immaculate drystone walling with old-fashioned roses such as ‘Tuscany Superb’ and ‘Cardinal de Richelieu’ amongst hardy geraniums, salvias and Delphinium ‘Summer Skies’. Rosa ‘Rose de Rescht’, which she has used as a hedge alongside ‘Walker’s Low’ catmint, is perfect for a small garden as it is neat and compact. Garden: A Very English Garden Designer: Janine Crimmins 3Natural ingredients PAULA MCWATERS Herbal and medicinal plants are not only perfect in cooking, they are attractive in the garden and great for attracting and encouraging pollinators. In Kate Savill and Tamara Bridge’s delightful evocation of a Northamptonshire hillside garden, they have used a host of bee-friendly plants and have even thought to incorporate a shallow bowl of water for bees to drink from. Angelica archangelica is a real statement plant at two metres tall, while at its feet, wild strawberries mingle with aromatic thyme, lemon balm, coriander and sweet cicely. For pops of edible colour choose borage and calendula – you can drop their flowers into salads. Garden: The Warner Edwards Garden Designer: Kate Savill and Tamara Bridge PAULA MCWATERS Spire-like flowers provide instant height and vertical interest if you are looking for strong impact and they have been used everywhere at Chelsea this year, never more so than in Mark Gregory’s contemporary take on a cottage garden. White delphiniums make the boldest of statements and these are echoed with white and purple lupins including ‘Noble Maiden’ and ‘Masterpiece’ and the much narrower flowers of Salvia nemerosa ‘Caradonna’ which will keep coming all summer long. Popping up between these you can dot aquilegias – Mark has used an old favourite ‘Ruby Port’ – with Euphorbia x martini for strong contrast. Garden: Welcome To Yorkshire – Gold Medal & Best Construction Winner Designer: Mark Gregory 5Keep it simple PAULA MCWATERS The simplest planting schemes of all stick to a limited palette of plants, repeating them several times around the garden to give a sense of cohesion and relying more on...

read more