August Meeting : 3 August 2018 at 10.00am

August Meeting : 3 August 2018 at 10.00am

This meeting will take place at the main entrance to  Steenbok Nature Reserve. Proceed along the concrete path for about 30 meters, the pod sits to the left of the pathway. Jayne Brink  and Gina Potgieter will give a short talk about the symbolism of the sculpture, the construction and why Steenbok was chosen.  Thereafter Roger Voysey (Curator of the Reserve) will give a short address about the rehabilitation of the area west of the tennis courts. Afterwards we will proceed to the Bowling club for tea.  You can then wander over to the rehabilitated  area at your leisure. The numerous pathways are safe to walk, you will enjoy the new vistas of the lagoon, salt marsh and Kingfisher Creek. Don’t forget your mug for tea!  Visitors are welcome: R20.00 per person payable at the entrance to the Reserve.   In the event of rain the meeting will take place at the Bowling Club.   During the Knysna Fires of 2017, two local residents Jayne Brink and Gina Potgieter initiated The Seed Shop project through their local businesses, Two on Toast and Madam Botany.  Their specific intention was to bring some kind of normality back to the donation process by setting-up a space in which the best of the donated items  received were thoughtfully displayed allowing people to ‘shop’ for what they not only needed but liked and would possibly have chosen in a store before all the chaos turned their lives upside down. They hoped to give value back to the second hand clothing and homeware received by displaying it carefully in amongst new treasures. They invented a ‘seed’ currency and each item donated was assigned a number of seeds depending on its assessed retail value.  Each household registered received a seed voucher which could be used to buy anything needed or loved on the shelves of the shop. With the residual funds from this venture they are able to build a Reflection Seed Pod in memoriam of the Knysna Fires.  They hope to give something back to all of Knysna by creating a sacred space for remembrance, reflection and gratitude. The Seed project has seen fit to partner with Eden Community Initiative (NPO) to project manage the installation. They have contracted Kluyts & Co to construct and install the artwork.   Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

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RHS Rosemoor: What to expect at Britain’s finest Rose Festival

RHS Rosemoor: What to expect at Britain’s finest Rose Festival

Rose Festival The Rose Festival celebrates the beauty and diversity of this favourite flower from Saturday 16 June until Sunday 22 July 2018 Rosemoor’s five-week-long Rose Festival offers a breath-taking showcase of colours and scents of the nation’s favourite flower. Boasting one of the UK’s largest collections of roses, RHS Garden Rosemoor is home to two dedicated rose gardens, bringing together more than 2,000 roses across more than 200 different varieties and a wealth of hues and perfumes. From cottage garden climbers, to bright and beautiful container varieties, there will be a rose to inspire and suit all gardens. As well as the stunning gardens, visitors can enjoy guided tours, expert advice from RHS horticulturists, a floral themed craft market, a rose trail, and much, much more. Country Life June 14, 2018 The RHS Rosemoor Rose Festival begins on Saturday June 16, a five-week celebration of Britain’s favourite flower that’s without peer.   The Queen Mother’s Rose Garden in Summer at RHS Garden Rosemoor. Every year, some eight billion roses are grown and sold in the UK – it’s the nation’s favourite flower. As such, the start, this Saturday, of the five-week Rose Festival at RHS Garden Rosemoor in Devon (which runs until July 22) is most welcome; the collection there is the largest in the country and includes 2,000 roses across 200 varieties, hues and scents. To celebrate the start of the festival, we’ve collected some superb pictures of previous year – to entice you along if you can, and to give you a flavour of what you’re missing if you can’t make it. There will be tours, expert advice and a floral-themed craft market; new this year is a planting of Rosa pax, a hybrid musk rose launched in 1918 to commemorate the end of the First World War. For more details visit www.rhs.org.uk/gardens/rosemoor Red Rosa ‘Dortmund’, Rosa ‘Comtesse de Murinais’, Rosa ‘Open Arm’ in the Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor Devon   The Shrub Rose Garden in June, RHS Rosemoor The Shrub Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor Cottage Garden at RHS Rosemoor Rosa ‘Erfurt’ pink roses in the Shrub Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor The Shrub Rose Garden at RHS Rosemoor in June Another view of the Shrub Rose Garden in June, RHS Rosemoor The thatched-roof summerhouse in the Cottage Gardenat RHS Rosemoor   Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

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Remembering the 7th June, 2017.

Remembering the 7th June, 2017.

“Scores of people were evacuated from their homes in Knysna as a fire threatens property in the Garden Route town. A section of the N2 between Knysna and Plettenberg Bay was closed to traffic as the fire is burning on both sides of the road. The first fire, which broke out near Plettenberg Bay on Tuesday night, was contained but there is another fire burning in a vast area close to Rheenendal. Strong winds are pushing the flames towards homes in Belvidere, Breonton-on-Sea and Rheenendal. Knysna Fire Chief Clint Manuel says crews are trying to get as many people away from danger. “We have evacuated the entire Belvidere and some people have come out, but we are getting reports of some people still on the inside. We are still trying to get them out and we are also trying to get them to the jetty where the NSRI can also pick them up.” Resident Richard Wallis says the situation is really bad. “Knysna is in perpetual darkness. It’s a disaster here. It’s crazy. Some people are fire-locked. They have water on the one side and the fire on the mountains on the other side. It’s really bad.” At the same time, three people have been reported dead in an incident emergency services are linking to the strong winds brought in by the storm which continues to sweep through the Peninsula. A farm worker and his wife and son are reported to have died in the area were fires fanned by Berg winds.” These were some of the reports, but it is the pictures that tells the story. A story that will be etched in the memory of all who have been affected.  A story of trauma, a story of compassion, a story of communities getting together helping one another, a story of rebuilding and  of new hope. On the 7th June, we were watching the fires encircling Knysna, but they seem to be a safe distance away … how wrong we were and how unprepared. We were totally unaware of the fire racing up the hill from  Salt river and Eastford,   the smoke was so dense that you could hardly see anything.  Only when the neighbours screamed that their house was on fire, the reality of the situation came home.  At that moment  the only thing on one’s mind was to find a safe place, away from the raging fire,  the stifling smoke and the incredible strong wind that was  whipping up fireballs. We evacuated at about 5.30 pm, not knowing what will happen. All we had with us were our phones, tablets and  a file which contained documents, and passports.  At that moment everything seemed to  trivial, all...

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World Environment Day, 5th June

World Environment Day, 5th June

World Environment Day Since it began in 1974, it has grown to become a global platform for public outreach that is widely celebrated in over 100 countries. (WED) is rearing its green head this Tuesday, 5 June, and here’s what you can do  in honour of the day. Visit one of Knysna’s nature reserves and pay it some much warranted love and appreciation. Avoid the use of plastic. Pledge Nature Reserve, Knysna CBD:  Help to restore this reserve to its formal glory were fynbos and forest species once thrived. The reserve was totally destroyed in the fire of 7th June 2017.  Masses of wattle and other invasive aliens have colonised the reserve, now it is up to dedicated volunteers to remove  the unwanted plant growth. Volunteer your services for 1 hour every Wednesday morning from 9.30.  The aim is to eradicate  all invasive species from the reserve.   Log on to: http://www.pledgenaturereserve.org/ Steenbok Nature Reserve, Leisure Isle: This lovely reserve is a haven for dog walkers, runners, and small children. The indigenous garden offers seasonal colour with magical backdrops of the Lagoon and Outeniqua Mountains.  Make a meaning contribution by joining Friends of Steenbok.  Log on to:  http://www.steenboknaturereserve.org.za/ READ: Endangered Species Day: What you need to know to help save SA’s natural heritage     Share this:Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new...

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Pearlfisher plastic awareness garden designer urges RHS to lead from the front

Pearlfisher plastic awareness garden designer urges RHS to lead from the front

This garden was awarded a Gold medal. 21 May 2018, by Matthew Appleby John Warland, designer of the Space to Grow garden, which is in partnership with NGO Plastic Oceans, says the RHS should lead from the front and ban plastic drink bottles from the show. Pearlfisher Warland said: “I think this garden should be a wake up call, drawing a line in the sand. Hopefully the RHS will now lead from the front with the demographic they have.” The show has banned plastic straws but there were no restrictions on plastic bottles, cutlery, plates, coffee cups, packaging, and plant pots. “Having a garden is generally a luxury and as is to come to Chelsea Flower Show. “The people who can come and have a garden have the money in their pocket to make a practical choice. “There is free water refills with Thames Water and no plastic straws but it would be good to lead from the front and take a little bit further. It would be nice if they couldn’t buy plastic drink bottles and in the next 12 months make every one a returnable bottle.” “There is 100% of waste recycled at the recycler but I think is a feel good to make that choice at this point and not at the waste depot. “People at the show would buy into that and be proud of it. It’s marginal gains but no plastic bottles you can buy in at the showground 2019 would be a win. It would be an easy win for RHS. He said having seen Kew Temperate House re-open last month, he believes a plant polymer from Kew could win a Nobel prize for beinga  plastic substitute. “I’m sure it will be some naturally-based material.” Prime Minster Theresa May visited the garden on 21 May. May has proposed plastic-free supermarket aisles, plus a ban on plastic straws, cotton buds and drinks stirrers. May also saw the Action Oak APHA garden and the Wuhan Water Garden at Chelsea. The RHS will visit Guangzho this year and is aiming for a Chelsea garden a year from 10 Chinese provinces, while a Chinese Chelsea remains a possibility. UK participation at the Beijing International Horticultural Expo 2019 is being led by the RHS and has received the backing of the Prime Minister.  Warland said when he entered the garden into Chelsea 12 months ago, plastic was not high on the agenda in horticulture. But since then Blue Planet 2 on BBC had highlighted plastic pollution in oceans. The garden, made of aquatic tanks plus cacti, succulents and Tillandsia imitating underwater coral and algae, highlights “the irrevocable impact of plastic waste on our precious ecosystems and is a call to action to brands, businesses...

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8 Chelsea Flower Show 2018 gardening trends you can try at home

8 Chelsea Flower Show 2018 gardening trends you can try at home

We’ve scoured Chelsea for the best new trends you can try in your own garden this summer PAULA MCWATERS BY PAULA MCWATERS MAY 22, 2018 Want to know all the Chelsea Flower Show 2018 gardening trends? This year’s show is underway and we were lucky enough to join the VIPs and royalty on Monday’s press day. CL Gardening Editor Paula McWaters has scoured the Chelsea Show Gardens and Artisan Gardens the displays to pick up on some of the best new trends you can try at home in your own garden this summer… 1Bring water centre stage PAULA MCWATERS At the end of a long tiring day, water is one of the most relaxing elements to come home to – both cooling and soothing to the nerves. Instead of confining it to one small area of the garden, David Neale has made it the central feature, wrapping paths of Portland stone and English oak around it so that the pool can be enjoyed from all sides. His planting scheme centres on rich blue Anchusa azurea ‘Dropmore’ with pops of amber and copper from bearded Iris ‘Carnival Time’, echoed in the rusted planters and citrus peel sculpture. Garden: The Silent Pool Gin Garden Designer: David Neale 2A romantic gesture PAULA MCWATERS There’s a return to old-fashioned romance in several of the gardens on Chelsea’s Main Avenue this year, with cottage favourites such as lupins and delphiniums making a welcome comeback. In the Artisan gardens, Janine Crimmins has gone for a country house feel, complementing immaculate drystone walling with old-fashioned roses such as ‘Tuscany Superb’ and ‘Cardinal de Richelieu’ amongst hardy geraniums, salvias and Delphinium ‘Summer Skies’. Rosa ‘Rose de Rescht’, which she has used as a hedge alongside ‘Walker’s Low’ catmint, is perfect for a small garden as it is neat and compact. Garden: A Very English Garden Designer: Janine Crimmins 3Natural ingredients PAULA MCWATERS Herbal and medicinal plants are not only perfect in cooking, they are attractive in the garden and great for attracting and encouraging pollinators. In Kate Savill and Tamara Bridge’s delightful evocation of a Northamptonshire hillside garden, they have used a host of bee-friendly plants and have even thought to incorporate a shallow bowl of water for bees to drink from. Angelica archangelica is a real statement plant at two metres tall, while at its feet, wild strawberries mingle with aromatic thyme, lemon balm, coriander and sweet cicely. For pops of edible colour choose borage and calendula – you can drop their flowers into salads. Garden: The Warner Edwards Garden Designer: Kate Savill and Tamara Bridge PAULA MCWATERS Spire-like flowers provide instant height and vertical interest if you are looking for strong impact and they have been used everywhere at Chelsea this year, never more so than in Mark Gregory’s contemporary take on a cottage garden. White...

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